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Former WWF Star Reveals Why He Couldn’t Cry At His Mother’s Funeral

Ahmed Johnson

• OLD SCHOOL VIDEO HISTORY (December 2, 1989) – WWF Superstars of Wrestling

On this day in 1989, the World Wrestling Federation aired an episode of their weekly TV show ‘WWF Superstars of Wrestling’.

This episode was pre-taped at the Expocentre in Topeka, Kansas and featured matches & storyline segments on the road to the ‘WWF No Holds Barred: The Match/The Movie’ PPV.

Here’s the card:

– The Ultimate Warrior vs. Len Wagner

– Bad News Brown vs. Chuck Coates

– Shawn Michaels & Marty Jannetty vs. Barry Horowitz & Conquistador #1

– Ted DiBiase vs. Mark Reagan

– The Red Rooster vs. Gene Ligon

– Jim Duggan vs. Scott Colton

– The Powers of Pain vs. Tom Fuller & Brian Johnson

• Former WWF Star Reveals Why He Couldn’t Cry At His Mother’s Funeral

In this flashback article, we take a look at an old shoot interview with former WWF Superstar Ahmed Johnson, where he talked about getting treated badly by his father during his childhood, getting rewarded for wrong things & more.

Below are the highlights:

Ahmed: I remember one time: We were real skinny as kids. I mean skinny skinny skinny. And we weren’t allowed to go on a refrigerator or touch any of the food. They gave it to us. I’m the middle kid, but my brother and sisters always looked up to me as being like the big head. I was always having to go out and steal food for them and we ate out of garbage cans, our neighbours’ garbage cans and stuff like that.

And I remember one time one of the situations was my father had left and we thought he was gone and my brother and sister – they were hungry. There were some hot dogs in refrigerator. So when he left I went there and I put two hot dogs and I was boiling them, so I can feed my brother and sister. And he came back home. I hear him coming home and he came in the door and he was like: “Who was cooking hot dogs!!”

And he tied me down to the bed, took the boiling water and pour it on my stomach. And it was so bad. I mean my skin came off. My skin just start bubbling up. And I remember him taking me and putting me in a bathtub full of cold water.

And when he did, my skin started peeling off and floating on the top of the water. The burn was so deep.

And I remember he wouldn’t take me to hospital or anything and I had to deal with that pain. He would just take Vaseline grease and butter and rub it on the burn, like that was supposed to stop the pain or whatever. And you had to be tough. He didn’t want you to cry.

Then another incident was I remember, my sister had a piggy bank and she thought somebody stole it. She couldn’t find it. And so he took all the boys, take all our clothes off and he got a stenching cord, a switch and a belt. I mean he beat us for hours. It was so bad that our actual blood and some of our skins were on the wall.

I mean the only beating I ever seen that came close to it, I don’t know if you’ve seen The Passion of the Christ. That beating that they gave Christ, that’s the only beating I ever seen came close what we got. And I’ve always been the leader. I was the middle kid but always was the one who took the blunt of everything. And I told him I did. I didn’t do it. I just wanted him to stop beating my brothers and I told him I did it. And man, he went berserk.

The thing about him was, he was a very intense violent man. And it started playing role in our lives. And I think that one of the reasons why I’m so good at the sports. I always had that extra edge and which is not a compliment by the way.

One time we were playing softball. We were in middle school. There was this guy and he was pitching and the recess was almost over and he said I’ll start pitching fast now. And I told him just don’t hit me with the ball. And he threw it and the ball just barely touched me but the fact I said don’t do it. And I hit this dude in head with that baseball bat. I mean blood went everywhere and put the kid in a coma for a little while.

I can remember the coach tackling me and holding me down and then they got me to principal’s office and they called my dad. I’m like, oh my god he’s gonna kill me now.

He (father) was part of a motorcycle gang called the Road Knights and you could hear them Harley’s coming down the street. There were like nine of them. They came to school and they walked in there and the cops were so scared of the Road Knights.

I remember him walking down and he was like, “What the f did you do now?” And the principal’s like, “He hit a kid with a baseball bat and kid is in coma.” And my dad looked at me and said, “What’d you do that for?”

I said because he hit me with the ball. And my dad said, “Oh he hit you with the ball first? Good. You should hit him. Let’s go.” And he took me out. He brought me ice cream like I was the greatest person on earth because I hurt somebody. That’s the kind of dad he was.

Host: What was your relationship with your mother?

Ahmed: She’s dead now, but I still have a severe problem with her. When she died, I couldn’t cry. I didn’t cry at her funeral. Because as a mother, I mean even if you’re scared, how could you allow someone to abuse your kid like that if you love your kids.

I have my six-year-old daughter with me, I have never slapped her once and I couldn’t if I had to because I love her just that much. I can yell at her and act like I’m gonna do something real tough. And it made it even more clear, when I have my own kid, for me to ask that question: “How can my mother not have stopped it?”

I mean yeah you’re scared, but you can’t let someone hurt your kids like that man if you love them. So that’s I’m dealing with that right now mentally with my mother. I love her, but I got a problem with her.

        
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